Why Do Companies Migrate to Azure?

In modern business, one of the areas expanding exponentially is Microsoft Azure’s cloud computing. More and more institutions, as well as individuals, are moving their computer-related tasks to Azure. This is part of the cloud computing age, which is going to grow more and more in the coming years.

Now, this raises a question: Why do companies migrate to Microsoft Azure?

There are many answers to this question. However, I will focus on two major reasons why companies migrate to Microsoft Azure: Reducing costs and increasing performance.

REDUCING COSTS

If I could pick one driver for migrating to Azure, it would be reducing costs. Remember, the cloud (including Azure, AWS, GCP, and more) is just a set of large datacenters that you rent to host your Information Technology tools. You pay a recurring cost to have the luxury of using another datacenter to run your tools.

With Azure cloud usage, you can reduce the overall Information Technology costs for some of the following reasons:

  1. No need to purchase and warranty servers
  2. No need to purchase and warranty routers and switches
  3. No need to purchase and warranty network area storage devices
  4. No need to purchase and warranty storage area network devices
  5. A cost reduction as you do not need to purchase and insure a building for a datacenter
  6. A cost reduction as you do not need to purchase and maintain the network connectivity for the building
  7. A cost reduction as you do not need to pay for the electricity to the building

And MUCH MORE…

These costs are given to Microsoft (if you are using Azure cloud), and the overall costs are then divided into hourly/computer-usage units, so you are only charged for what you use. Most businesses only use a small fraction of the total computer power available to them, so the costs are a fraction of what the current spending is.

INCREASING PERFORMANCE

One of the largest advantages that Microsoft Azure presents is its ability to increase performance. Microsoft is continually building more servers across the United States and the world at large.
As these new datacenters are constructed, the latest and greatest physical devices and networking are used to provide users with the best experience in Azure. Additionally, new tools are continuously being made available in the various portals for Azure, which increase the options for performance and optimizing execution.

With Azure cloud usage, you can increase the overall performance of your Information Technology infrastructure for some of the following reasons:

  1. You can increase application compute resources within seconds
  2. You can increase application network resources within seconds
  3. You can increase application storage resources within seconds
  4. You can increase application database resources within seconds
  5. You can increase application security resources within seconds
  6. You can link multiple copies of an application infrastructure (redundancy) for near 100% availability
  7. The supporting platform in Microsoft Azure will have the latest updates, improving performance and stability

And MUCH MORE…

For so many reasons like the ones above, it is easy to see why companies are eager to move more tools to the cloud — YOU ARE GETTING MORE PERFORMANCE FOR LESS COST.

What Is a Datacenter?

When computers were first mass adopted in society, there were mainframes and large consoles were used to access the mainframe. These mainframes were as large as basements in modern homes or even larger; they required (at times) custom, dedicated power lines just to keep them powered.

Furthermore, they were extremely expensive (the Harvard Mark I mainframe….used in the 1940s and later … had a manufacturing cost of $200,000 USD — in 2020, that would be around $3 million USD). These mainframes were used to calculate (think SUPER calculators), primarily using information called data.

These machines were quite big; the Harvard Mark I was 9,500 pounds, or over 4 tons and was over 50 feet long. As more widespread adoption of these units became a reality, these units required massive amounts of customized real estate to house them.

Basically, you needed a large ‘center’ to house these machines that calculated new ‘data.’ Welcome to the idea of a datacenter!

A short, concise understanding of the term datacenter is a large area or room dedicated to housing larger computing devices and the network/electricity/etc. needed to keep them up and running as close to 100% of the time as possible.

Fast-forward to 2020. The typical modern datacenter may have some AS400 units (modern mainframe), but will also have large metal shelfs (called racks) which hold servers, network switches, network routers, network patch panels, backup tape drives, NAS and SAN storage units, and more. The main purpose of all these devices is to do the large calculation, manipulation, and distribution of information for an organization.

Think of it this way:

For most companies, most of the large data sets and information tables stored and updated/calculated against are stored in datacenters. Furthermore, the cloud concept is renting datacenter access from other companies (eg., Microsoft Azure).

To summarize, a data center is the large area or room dedicated to housing larger computing devices and the network/electricity/etc. needed to keep them up and running as close to 100% of the time as possible.